The first disposable diaper was invented by Valerie Hunter-Gordon (nee De Ferranti),granddaughter of inventor Sebastian Ziani de Ferranti

In 1946, Marion Donovan Used a shower curtain from her bathroom to create the “Boater“, a plastic cover to go outside a diaper. First sold in 1949 at Saks Fifth Avenue‘s flagship store in New York City, patents were later issued in 1951 to Donovan who later sold the rights to the waterproof diaper for $1 mill.

In 1947, a housewife in the UK, Valerie Hunter Gordon, started developing and making Paddy, a 2-part system of a disposable pad (cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) and an outer plastic, adjustable garment with press-studs/ snaps. Initially she used old parachutes for the garment). She applied for the patent in April 1948, it was granted for the UK in

During the 1950s, companies such as Johnson and Johnson, Kendall, Parke-Davis, Playtex, and Molnlycke entered the disposable diaper market.

 

In 1956, Procter & Gamble began researching disposable diapers. Presented to Fred Wells as ‘project p-57’ (this was the plane Wells had taught American pilots to fly during WWII)

Over the next few decades, the disposable diaper industry boomed and the competition between Procter & Gamble’s Pampers and Kimberly Clark’s Huggies

Washing cloth diapers at home uses 50 to 70 gallons of water every three days, which is roughly equivalent to flushing the toilet 15 times a day, unless the user has a high-efficiency washing machine. An average diaper service puts its diapers through an average of 13 water changes, but uses less water and energy per diaper than one laundry load at home.

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